Daily Reflections: November 14, 2018

INTUITION AND INSPIRATION

“. . . we ask God for inspiration, an intuitive thought or a decision. We relax and take it easy. We don’t struggle.”
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 86

I invest my time in what I truly love. Step Eleven is a discipline that allows me and my Higher Power to be together, reminding me that, with God’s help, intuition and inspiration are possible. Practice of the Step brings on self-love. In a consistent attempt to improve my conscious contact with a Higher Power, I am subtly reminded of my unhealthy past, with its patterns of grandiose thinking and false feelings of omnipotence. When I ask for the power to carry out God’s will for me, I am made aware of my powerlessness. Humility and healthy self-love are compatible, a direct result of working Step Eleven.

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

Daily Reflections: November 13, 2018

LOOKING OUTWARD 

“We ask especially for freedom from self-will and are careful to make no request for ourselves only. We may ask for ourselves, however, if others will be helped. We are careful never to pray for our own selfish ends. “
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS p. 87

As an active alcoholic, I allowed selfishness to run rampant in my life. I was so attached to my drinking and other selfish habits that people and moral principles came second. Now, when I pray for the good of others rather than my “own selfish ends,” I practice a discipline in letting go of selfish attachments, caring for my fellows and preparing for the day when I will be required to let go of all earthly attachments.

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

Daily Reflections: November 12, 2018

MORNING THOUGHTS

“Ask Him in your morning meditation what you can do each day for the man who is still sick.”
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 164

For many years I pondered over God’s will for me, believing that perhaps a great destiny had been ordained for my life. After all, having been born into a specific faith, hadn’t I been told early that I was “chosen”? It finally occurred to me, as I considered the above passage, that God’s will for me was that I Practice Step Twelve on a daily basis. Furthermore, I realized that I should do this to the best of my ability. I soon learned that the practice aids me in keeping my life in the context of the day at hand.

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

Daily Reflections: November 10, 2018

A SENSE OF BELONGING

“Perhaps one of the greatest rewards of meditation and prayer is the sense of belonging that comes to us.”
TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 105

That’s what it is— — belonging! After a session of meditation I knew that the feeling I was experiencing was sense of belonging because I was so relaxed. I felt quieter inside, more willing to discard little irritations. I appreciated my sense of humor. What I also experience in my daily practice is the sheer pleasure of belonging to the creative flow of God’s world. How propitious for us that prayer and meditation are written right into our A.A. way of life.

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

Daily Reflections: November 9, 2018

STEPPING INTO THE SUNLIGHT

“But first of all we shall want sunlight; nothing much can grow in the dark. Meditation is our step out into the sun.”
AS BILL SEES IT, p. 10

Sometimes I think I don’t have time for prayer and meditation, forgetting I always found the time to drink. It is possible to make time for anything I want to do if I want it badly enough. When I start the routine of prayer and meditation, it’s a good idea to plan to devote a small amount of time to it. I read a page from our Fellowship’s books in the morning, and say “Thank You God,” when I go to bed at night. As prayer becomes a habit, I will increase the amount of time spent on it, without even noticing the foray it makes into my busy day. If I have trouble praying, I just repeat the Lord’s Prayer because it really covers everything. Then I think of what I can be grateful for and say a word of thanks.
I don’t need to shut myself in a closet to pray. It can be done in a room full of people. I just remove myself mentally for an instant. As the practice of prayer continues, I will find I don’t need words, for God can, and does, hear my thoughts through silence.

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

Daily Reflections: November 7, 2018

LET GO AND LET GOD

“. . . praying only for knowledge of his will for us and the power to carry that out.”
TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 96

When I “Let Go and Let God,” I think more clearly and wisely. Without having to think about it, I quickly let go of things that cause me immediate pain and discomfort. Because I find it hard to let go of the kind of worrisome thoughts and attitudes that cause me immense anguish, all I need do during those times is allow God, as I understand Him, to release them for me, and then and there, I let go of the thoughts, memories and attitudes that are troubling me.

When I receive help from God, as I understand Him, I can live my life one day at a time and handle whatever challenges that come my way. Only then can I live a life of victory over alcohol, in comfortable sobriety.

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

Daily Reflections: November 6, 2018

GOING WITH THE FLOW 

“Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him . . .”
Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, p. 96

The first words I speak when arising in the morning are, ” I arise, O god, to do Thy Will.” This is the shortest prayer I know and it is deeply ingrained in me. Prayer doesn’t change God’s attitude toward me; it changes my attitude toward God. As distinguished from prayer, meditation is a quiet time, without words. To be centered is to be physically relaxed, emotionally calm, mentally focused and spiritually aware.
One way to keep the channel open and to improve my conscious contact with God is to maintain a grateful attitude. On the days when I am grateful, good things seem to happen in my life. The instant I start cursing things in my life, however, the flow of good stops. God did not interrupt the flow; my own negativity did.

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.